I’ve known our team’s business development architect, Mike, for a little over half a year now. So, I was a bit confused when I read a tweet from him saying:

Exhibit A

Exhibit A

When I asked Mike why he had sent me a greet tweet about our existing relationship, he had no idea what I was talking about. He was unaware of his own tweet… Oh, and Mike doesn’t have schizophrenia. We were momentarily dumbfounded as to how I could have possibly recieved a tweet from him that he did not send… or approve. Then, it came to us in noticing the little grey text beneath the tweet that simply says “Hashable.” Mike had downloaded Hashable‘s networking app due to all of their promotion efforts at SXSW.

A few days later, I received another tweet from Mike (also known as mike_zurk on Twitter). It read:

Hashable Exhibit B

Exhibit B

Mike and I were at SXSW hanging out on Sixth St. at the time, and I figured that @inthekisser was the handle for someone Mike had met whom he wanted me to meet at the conference…

But it wasn’t. Mike had no idea who inthekisser was. That tweet had also been sent by Hashable… through Mike’s twitter. A little spooky.

Mike then tweeted his thoughts:

Exhibit C

Exhibit C

So, then out of frustration of not knowing whether tweets from mike_zurk were from Mike or Hashable, I tweeted to Hashable and the editor of TechCruch @Arrington in hopes to stop the madness:

Exhibit D

Exhibit D

Then, the director of products at Hashable, David Sebag, tweeted to me first thing in the morning:

Exhibit E

Exhibit E

And as I was about to take off from Austin-Bergstrom International Airport back to JFK, Hashable’s CEO Michael Yavonditte tweeted me:

Exhibit WTF

Exhibit WTF

I suppose I shouldn’t have been really surprised that Hashable was sending me false messages on my colleague’s behalf, pretending to be him with colloquialisms in the phrasing while introducing me to people he didn’t know. My fault.

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